The Rise and Fall of Fast Track Trade Authority

“The Rise and Fall of Fast Track Trade Authority” is a book that explores the process of designing U.S. trade agreements from 1789 to the present.

Under the U.S. Constitution, Congress writes the laws and sets trade policy. And so it was for 200 years. Over the last few decades, presidents have seized those powers through a mechanism known as Fast Track. Fast Track facilitated controversial pacts such as NAFTA and the World Trade Organization, which extend beyond traditional tariff-cutting to set constraints on domestic financial, energy, patents and copyright, food safety, immigration and other policies.

Because Fast Track’s dramatic shift in the balance of powers between branches of government occurred via an arcane procedural mechanism, it obtained little scrutiny – until recently. Its use by Democratic and Republican presidents alike to seize Congress’ constitutional prerogatives, “diplomatically legislate” non-trade policy, and reempt state policy, has made it increasingly controversial.

“Rise and Fall” explores the process of designing U.S. trade agreements from 1789 to the present. Congress’ last delegation of Fast Track terminated in 2007. At issue is what negotiating and approval process can best secure prosperity for the greatest number of Americans, while preserving the vital tenets of American democracy and our constitutional checks and balances in the era of globalization.

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